Generating Genius with L’Oréal and the Royal Institution 2013-14

This year the L’Oréal Young Scientist Centre team have collaborated on a new programme with L’Oréal UK & Ireland and educational charity Generating Genius to give promising A-level science students from disadvantaged backgrounds a real insight into what it is like to be a scientist or an engineer.

The aim of the four month hands-on programme was to showcase the wealth of exciting careers studying science can lead to and to encourage the students to pursue a science, technology, engineering or mathematics related degree at university.

For more info, click here: http://bit.ly/1B3ACJx

Uploaded by: The Royal Institution.

Black hole Firewalls with Sean Carroll and Jennifer Ouellette

What would you experience if you jumped into a black hole?

Conventionally, physicists have assumed that if the black hole is large enough, the gravitational forces won’t become extreme until you approach the singularity. There, the gravitational pull will be so much stronger on your feet than your head, that you will be ‘spaghettified’. Now, a new theory proposes that instead of spaghettification, you will encounter a massive wall of fire that will incinerate you on the spot, before you get close to turning into vermicelli.

In this special Ri event, science writer Jennifer Ouellette and physicist Sean Carroll explore the black hole firewall paradox, the exotic physics that underlies the new theory and what the paradox tells us about how new scientific theories are proposed, tested and accepted.

Duration: 01:27:44

via The Royal Institution.
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World Cup Fail: the science of Lampard’s ‘goal’

Who needs goal-line technology when you have physics? Watch as Andy explains how a little bit of physics could’ve proved that Lampard’s disallowed 2010 world cup goal went in.

In a crucial World Cup 2010 knock-out match, with the game in the balance, Frank Lampard scored a beautiful goal from outside the area. It thwacked the underside of the crossbar, bounced inside the goal, and then bounced back out.

But the celebrations were over before they had even begun. Neither the referee nor linesman thought the ball had crossed the line. No goal was given, play continued, and England ultimately crashed out of the competition.

Goal-line technology is the solution many called for, but perhaps there was a simpler option: teach referees a bit of physics. Here, Andy returns to the Ri Prep Room to use a simple demo to explain how the spin of the ball made it bounce out of the goal, and why the referees shouldn’t have needed any technology to know it was a goal.

via The Royal Institution.


Copy number variation and the secret of life - with Aoife McLysaght

Evolution is powered by variation: the differences in DNA sequences. One hugely important form of difference is copy number variation, where genes are duplicated or deleted from one generation to the next.

In this Ri event, Aoife McLysaght from Univeristy of Dublin explains how copy number variations gave us colour vision, a sense of smell and haemoglobin in our blood, before exploring the role they play in diseases such as cancer, autism and schizophrenia.

The event ‘Too Much of a Good Thing’ was presented at the Ri on Friday 28 March and forms part of the Ri’s all-women line up for Friday Evening Discourses in 2014 as part of a year-long celebration of women in science.

Duration: 53:35

via The Royal Institution.
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The Science of Laughter with Sophie Scott

If you ask people what makes them laugh, they will tell you they laugh at jokes: however if you look at when they laugh a very different pattern emerges, in which laughter can be seen as an extremely important social emotion.

In this Ri event, Sophie Scott explores the science of laughter, from laughter in other animals to the acoustics of laughter, and the ways that laughter is processed in our brains.

The science of laughter was presented at the Ri on Friday 28 March 2014.

This event is part of our all-women line up for Friday Evening Discourses in 2014 as part of our year long celebration of women in science.

Duration: 01:16:45

via The Royal Institution.
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